Posts Tagged ‘Olympics

14
Aug
12

Medal Tally: The Games of the XXX Olympiad

London 2012 or the 2012 Summer Olympic Games had just concluded, with the United States of America taking back their dominance over China for the top spot on the medal rankings.  Host country Great Britain took the third spot outranking the Russian Federation and Republic of Korea for the top five.  Here are the list of all countries that took home an Olympic medal.

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06
Jul
12

Survival: Olympic Athlete Montage Video for London 2012

Are you ready for the London 2012 Summer Olympic Games?  Well, before the games officially begin on July 27, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) released this Olympic athlete montage video featuring the London 2012 official song, Survival, by Muse.  Enjoy! 🙂

18
Aug
10

YOG Singapore 2010: Athletics

No medal has been won yet in the athletics, but the competition is just as high as it can be!  Makes you forget that these athletes are youngsters 18 years old and below (born between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 1994 are eligible to compete):

What a showdown! Even in YOG they remain rivals.

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15
Aug
10

“I Gotta Feeling…”—the First Youth Olympic Games, Singapore

The song “I Gotta Feeling” by the Black Eyed Peas is a very memorable song for me as every time I hear it, it reminds me of a special occasion: last year’s Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon.  That was one of the songs playing before the marathon started and it was then that it stuck.  Last night it was again one of the preferred songs for the opening ceremonies of the inaugural Youth Olympic Games (YOG) in Singapore.

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13
May
10

Experience the World through Sports: Sports Tourism

Given a chance, who wouldn’t want to travel?  But travelling for sports?  That’s a different story altogether.

We typically travel either for business or leisure, and if it’s the latter we usually have relaxation in mind.  And relaxation doesn’t usually involve moving too much!

Sports Tourism is a niche of the travel industry with sports at its core—either through spectating or participation.  You need not go abroad to watch the World Cup or Olympics, or be an athlete yourself to be called a sports tourist—you already are when you went out of town for that basketball game!  Indeed spectating is the most relaxed form of sports tourism, but why stay behind the scenes when you can be part of the action?

A year ago I went to Singapore for some hard labor—not for employment as typically expected with most Pinoys—I went to run a marathon!  Even Singaporeans that I met were surprised that I visited their country for four days just to run.  I was a perfect example of a sports tourist!

The Philippines has much more to offer than Singapore as far as tourism is concerned.  The latter despite being one of the smallest countries in the world it is frequented annually by a lot of visitors.  It is so small in fact that you can practically cover the entire island in less than a day!  So what keeps tourists coming back to Singapore?  Sports!  Aside from world class marathons, the country is also popular for its F1 races and now they even host a 70.3 Ironman race.  Imagine all the income these tourists bring to their economy annually?

The Philippines may not have as developed tourism infrastructure as other countries but as far as sports tourism is concerned we’ve got so much to offer.  Recently our surfing spots are becoming world famous and also a similarly world-class 70.3 Ironman race reached our shores. Even our local running scene attracts some foreign elite athletes.  It may not be as much as with other countries but it’s a good start.  Mainly fuelled by locals, Philippine sports tourism needs all the support it can get, but what’s in it for you?

With sports tourism you get to view a place in an unusual perspective—like watching a movie behind the scenes.  But don’t be contented with “viewing,” participate! Participation in sports allows you to “experience” the place—and you don’t need to be an elite athlete to enjoy it.  We can say that sports tourists don’t just “visit” the place, they “experience” it!  And the Philippine advantage is that you have a lot to choose from for every budget!

For starters you can try “jogging” along baywalk (or a nearby park).  Once you get started everything becomes easier, and before you knew it you’d be taking that six hour bus ride or that next flight out just to participate with your favorite sports!

I was once just like every yuppie out there stuck between the walls of the office cube during office hours but through sports I was set free!  Little did I know that aside from being good for health, through sports I’d be able to experience the world in a unique way!  Don’t just take my word for it; experience it for your own.  Stop thinking and start doing.  Are you ready to make your own experiences?

Note: This article was originally intended for print.

01
Feb
10

Pedestrianism

It started with my search for the exact length of the mile in kilometers when I stumbled upon a popular 19th century sport Pedestrianism.

Pedestrianism is a 19th century form of competitive walking from which the modern sport of Racewalking developed.  By the end of the 18th century, feats of foot travel over great distances gained attention, and were labeled “Pedestrianism.”  One of the most famous pedestrians of the day was Captain Robert Barclay Allardice, known as “The Celebrated Pedestrian,” of Stonehaven whose most impressive feat was to walk a mile every hour for 1000 hours, which he achieved between the 1st of June and the 12th of July, 1809 (thus covering 1,000 miles during the period).  Another popular goal was for competitors in long distance walks to walk 100 miles in less than 24 hours, from which they earned the nickname “Centurians.”  How many Ultramarathoners do you know in recent history that made such feat?

The world’s busiest pedestrian crossing: Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan

If you think about it Pedestrianism is much like a modern Ultramarathon, and as a form of sport it would be much older than the modern marathon which was introduced in the modern Olympics in 1896 (and standardized in 1921).

ING New York City Marathon

Looking back at sports history is really an educational journey, not to mention interesting.  Who would’ve thought that people have been doing Ultras long before we had marathon races?

For what it’s worth, a mile is 1.609344 kilometers long, and the current IAAF record for the fastest mile was 3:43.13, set by Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco in Rome on July 7, 1999.




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