Posts Tagged ‘Cavite

14
Nov
16

Taste Cavite: Touring Cavite by Food!

How would you like to sample the best dishes of Cavite without going through the entire province?  Or to put it simply, how would you like to taste a lot of great food in one place?  That’s what “Taste Cavite” is all about, and here’s how you can enjoy it yourselves.

This way please… 🙂

Continue reading ‘Taste Cavite: Touring Cavite by Food!’

29
Jul
13

Karera Lakas Pilipinas

The Philippine Marine Corps together with the Lakas Pilipinas Team, is organizing an event entitled Karera Lakas Pilipinas, Tibay ng Marino Lakas ng Pilipino serving as an advocacy on health and fitness.  This will happen on August 25 this year in time with National Heroes Day celebration.

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15
Jun
10

Life’s a Beach

A week after returning from the shores of Boracay I found myself back at the beach!  This time around though it was much closer to Manila, around 110 kilometers south at the beaches of Canyon Cove, Nasugbu, Batangas.

Bus route from Tagaytay City to Nasugbu

Batangas as far as I know isn’t really popular for white beaches but surprisingly Canyon Cove was, although disappointingly as well, it was very short!  At around 400 meters it was long enough, but not long enough for a run!  You know “those” crazy runners thinking of running first, swimming later when on the beach!

The beaches of Canyon Cove actually reminded me of Puca (Shell) beach in Boracay (where I was a week earlier, hehe) because of its color and the “sands” that never really compacts.  Normally sands on the beach becomes so compact that you hardly sink but like Puca I always sink deep whenever I step on its sands.  Only near the either ends of the beach are the sands fine enough to be truly compact and not sink so much.  (I placed quotes on “sands” because white beaches are normally composed of broken corals and shells, not sands.)

A view of the beach

Travel Tip: Canyon Cove isn’t the most practical beach resort to go into, but don’t expect it to be “exclusive” as we saw quite a lot of tourists, both local and foreign, that weekend.

The other side of the beach

Aside from swimming on the beach Canyon Cove also offers the typical banana boat, Jet Ski, and Kayak rentals, but if you’ve had enough salt their big pool is excellent.  At about five feet deep it makes for a great lap pool although its irregular shape and lots of swimmers you share it with makes it more challenging.

The pool of Canyon Cove courtesy Staphanie Madla (click to vote for SEA Awards for Photography)

Getting There (via Commute)

Canyon Cove is located south of Punta Fuego and is just a few minutes from the center of the municipality of Nasugbu, Batangas which is about 50 kilometers away from Tagaytay.  Nasugbu being a popular destination in itself is just about a three hours bus ride from Pasay bus terminal (near Taft Ave. Station of MRT-3 in EDSA) on an ideal day.  Ticket costs P155 (as of June 2010) but be warned though that the bus route passes through the most congested roads in the country crossing just about every choke point Cavite has to offer, so avoid travelling during peak hours.  You can take a tricycle ride from your bus terminal to Canyon Cove’s entrance, or if you know your directions you can opt to run (about 2K).

Canyon Cove

Barefoot Running, Again

Canyon Cove would be my third time to run barefoot and based on my observations it really does help a lot in teaching us the right landing.  The “right” landing or foot strike, be it forefoot, midfoot, or heel strike, really varies by individual so it is all about what works for you, although it is still encouraged to avoid heel striking.  The combination of practically no impact surface plus the difficulty of some loose sands teaches you on how you can improve your running by finding your most efficient foot strike.  Personally I’m learning how to further distribute (and reduce) the impact by finding that ideal landing spot for me.  Let’s just say that my knee isn’t back to normal yet so there’s practically zero run mileage for me for the past several weeks, but despite that I was able to run as long as 6K pain-free on the beach!  Sometimes I wonder if I should just fill my shoes with sands from the beach to simulate barefoot beach running. 🙂

Canyon Cove via Google Maps

Before any runner leaves the beach he’s sure to leave his mark there, and despite hating doing laps if it’s on the beach I have no qualms.  I made sure to leave a temporary 1K trail of my footprints at the beaches of Canyon Cove before leaving, very short (that I wouldn’t even log it on my dailymile) due to lack of time but at least I left my mark (runningpinoy was here!).  I also had a “strange” uncomfortable feeling of being stared at so two and a half laps of the beach would suffice to fulfill my cravings.  (I heard a lady singing a line “I’ll be there…” from the theme song of Baywatch as I ran in front of them and coincidentally I was in my red shorts. I hope I didn’t remind them of David Hasselhoff!)

02
Sep
09

In Pictures: Weekend Adventure in Maragondon

Changing pace… finding ourselves an adventure!  It involved…

An old church

An old church

Hanging bridge

Hanging bridge

Trails

Trails

Rice fields

Rice fields

River crossings

River crossings

Seeds

Seeds

Reminders

Reminders

Bamboo paths

Bamboo paths

Friends

Friends

More hanging bridges

More hanging bridges

Andres Bonifacio Shrine

Andres Bonifacio Shrine

Spectacular sunset

Spectacular sunset

Interesting river

Interesting river

It was a unique weekend for us, we did something we don’t usually do, and learned a lot from each other.  It was another one of those “team-building” moments that I always look forward to.  Hope you guys had an interesting weekend as well!

07
Aug
09

Yet Another 56K Ultra Weekend: Manila To Tagaytay Sequel

It was a race-less weekend last Sunday so what else does a runner do but to find an interesting run. An ultramarathon distance route isn’t exactly a prerequisite but in order to share that ultramarathon experience I decided to join my friends at their first attempt at an ultra—where else but in the same route that we took about three months ago—Luneta (Km 0) to Tagaytay (Km 56).

Part 1: Luneta (Km 0) to Dasmariñas, Cavite
(approx. Km 30) in Pictures

The gang meeting near Km 0 just before midnight

The brave ones who opted to start from Km 0

Finally I had a chance to get a picture with this babe

One last picture before heading off…

About half an hour after midnight, ready, set…

…56K here we go!

Our Km 0 support vehicle

Running along Roxas Blvd.

The first “pic-stop” midway along Roxas Blvd.

Second stop before running parallel to Coastal Road

Third stop, finally in Bacoor, Cavite for some carbo-loading

Another stop at a gas station to regroup…

…and have some pictures taken

Entering Dasmariñas, Cavite…

Finally by stroke of daylight we were joined by “fresh legs,” still in Dasmariñas

About halfway through our ultra-runabout more runners joined the pack as well as another support vehicle. The good thing about this leg was that you’re sure of company because of the number of runners in the group. Unfortunately everything goes uphill from here, literally, so the “real” challenge was just about to begin.

(To be continued)

01
Jul
09

runningpinoy’s 2009 Midyear Report

2009 is my first full year of running and with the first half completed its time to have a look back at some of my highlights for the first six months of the year.

January

The year started with “bi-polar” races: one was well praised and the other went in infamy.  Of course I’m referring to TNF Thrill of the Trail in Nasugbu, Batangas and PSE Bull Run in Bonifacio Global City, respectively.  While people can’t stop being enthusiastic about their wonderful experience with the trails of Batulao and the race overall (including myself), it was the complete opposite on the other side of the track—I’ve never heard of so much complaints about a race and it probably had the record of the longest queue at the finish.

Thrill of the Trail, Nasugbu, Batangas

The following weekend race was probably redemption for a lot of runners with the Happy Run—another RunRio event that was one of the most organized and fun race of the year thus far.

With some happy runners

It was also during this month that I acquired my Garmin 405—just a day before we were off for Batangas for the TNF Thrill of the Trails where it had an excellent stage for a debut.  Also having a debut on this race was my first trail shoes, New Balance 811.

Garmin Forerunner® 405

Garmin Forerunner® 405

February

February was the first month since I started running that I had zero races.  This was the first of two months that I was in Ohio, USA and in spite of being race-less I was not run-less: the below freezing temperature wasn’t enough to stop me from running outdoors—an experience that I suggest everyone try at least once in their lives.  While I was “chilling” on the other side of the world the race scene in the Philippines ensued the love month.  There wasn’t much high-profile races for this month making my craving for races more bearable.

My winter gear: a runner’s beanie, windbreaker with regular white cotton t-shirt, pair of gloves, thermal tights, cushioned socks, and trail running shoes

My winter gear: a runner’s beanie, windbreaker with regular white cotton t-shirt, pair of gloves, thermal tights, cushioned socks, and trail running shoes

Before leaving for the US I managed to have my first LSD (Long Slow Distance) run along one of the dreaded routes in the Metro—EDSA, from North Ave. all the way to the SM Mall of Asia grounds.

After finishing my EDSA LSD

After finishing my EDSA LSD

March

By the time race season was starting in the US due to the arrival of spring I was unfortunate enough to be packing my bags for home thereby missing the opportunity to participate in races stateside, but on the bright side I was back for one of the most anticipated races of the year—Condura Run.  This race was one of the rare opportunities to run on the SkyWay and was also my first half-marathon and first race medal.  Also first for this event was the Carbo-Loading Party of takbo.ph which they say was a first for a half-marathon race.

Running with friends at the SkyWay

Running with friends at the SkyWay

April

This was the month of LSDs for me as there were only a handful of races set.  Among these routes were Commonwealth Ave. to Bonifacio High Street via C5; Commonwealth Ave. to SM Mall of Asia via Quezon Ave., España Ave., and Roxas Blvd.; and my first LSD on trails in Montalban.

View from the summit of Montalban

View from the summit of Montalban

Arguably the highlight race of this month was the Greenfield City Run in Sta. Rosa, Laguna.  With its free shuttle service many runners were given chance to run outside Metro Manila and experience the fresh landscape of the rural areas.

Another finishers medal courtesy of Greenfield City Run

Another finisher’s medal courtesy of Greenfield City Run

May

May boasts the longest and one of the most difficult races in the country, The North Face 100 (or simply TNF100).  Many underestimated the trails of Sacobia, Clark before they even embarked on it so it was a shock for many, even seasoned ultramarathoners, on how difficult this race was this year resulting in only a select few proud finishers.  This was my first attempt at an ultramarathon and I am very proud to be one of the few finishers of this race.  It was also my longest distance-wise at 100K, and time-wise at 30 hours (raw time that includes eating, resting, and some dozing off).

Sunrise during TNF100

Sunrise during TNF100

May also sparked my return to trekking with our initial climb to the summit of Mt. Maculot in Cuenca, Batangas.  This became a “team-building” activity for me and my takbo.ph friends and because we had taken an unexpectedly difficult trail it also served as my training for TNF100 that followed two weeks after.

Having breakfast on the summit of Mt. Maculot

Having breakfast on the summit of Mt. Maculot

The month was ended by a rivalry of two high-profile races: The Earth Run at McKinley Hill and Microsoft’s IE8 Run at Bonifacio Global City.  It was a difficult time for runners on which “side” to choose but in the end The Earth Run came out with being more competitive and having more attendance.

Medal from the Earth Run

Medal from the Earth Run

June

The month kicked off with another high-profile and highly anticipated race, the Mizuno Infinity Run.  Coming from a popular footwear brand, this race has a good set of followers which were not disappointed with the race outcome as it became the first race to have a “Time Challenge.”  This year’s participants had their finish time recorded for next year’s race where they can challenge their previous record for a chance of a prize.

Kicking off June with Mizuno Infinity Run

Kicking off June with Mizuno Infinity Run

The second week of June was the Independence Week with the 12th of the month being the Independence Day of the Philippines.  For a change I left my running shoes home and put on my trail running shoes for the first Freedom Climb—40 summits nationwide simultaneously having flag raising ceremonies to commemorate the occasion.  It was the first official climb of our takbo.ph offshoot group, the RunHikers as a group, in Pico de Loro, Cavite.

On our way to Pico de Loro during Freedom Climb

On our way to Pico de Loro during Freedom Climb

If May brags of an ultra-trail race, June is not far with an ultra and trails.  More like a month-wide split of the TNF100, June had an ultramarathon road race: Botak 100, and two trail run (and bike) races: King of the Mountain (KOM) in Timberland and Men’s Health All Terrain in Sta. Elena, Laguna.

Sunrise over Sta. Elena, Laguna during Mens Health All Terrain

Sunrise over Sta. Elena, Laguna during Men’s Health All Terrain

The All Terrain race was a good race overall especially for introducing trail runs for beginners.  The race was well-organized flawed only by the fact that the trails were a little dull.  This was salvation for Men’s Health reputation from their abysmal past races.

Finally to close the first half of the year was Botak 100—the first ultramarathon road race in Mega Manila.  Despite Botak’s attempt to salvage their reputation from the last race that plagued them, it was “A” (H1N1) viral issue that hampers their efforts.  That issue led them to postpone the side events of this race to the dismay of some runners (myself included).  Fortunately enough the ultramarathon road race pulled their reputation forward that Botak could be proud to say that they “pulled it off.”  Surely there were still a lot of shortcomings but as an “active spectator” all these issues were negligible.  Welcome back, Botak!

Pacer at Botak 100

Pacer at Botak 100 (courtesy Marvin)

Truly it was a roller-coaster ride for the first half—events fell on either side of the poles.  From the best to the worst these races and other side events really made the first half of 2009 quite remarkable.  Now that the second half is about to begin, will it be able to outshine the half that was?  Or will the race organizers sit on their laurels and stop innovation?  I guess we’ll all find out soon enough.




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The MIRACLE isn’t that I finished.  The miracle is that I had the COURAGE to START
– John “The Penguin Runner” Bingham
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